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The motor mouth falls silent again…

Francis’ Video Message to Ireland ahead of Abortion Referendum on May 25, 2018

(click video to play message)

It’s official now: The once-Catholic nation of Ireland has voted to repeal its eighth constitutional amendment and “legalize” abortion. It cannot be imagined how many more preborn children will now be torn from the natural habitat of their mothers’ wombs because of this decision.

What did “Pope” Francis have to say about it? You can find out by clicking the video above. Go ahead and do so — it is only ten seconds long. To let the cat straight out of the bag: The man who inserts himself into every discussion and whose lips never stop moving had nothing to say about the Irish abortion referendum. Chirping crickets made more noise about it than Jorge Bergoglio did.

Since Mar. 13, 2013, the Bergoglian jaws have been moving non-stop. No event or objective has been so remote or trivial that Francis wouldn’t have some kind of advice, encouragement, or exhortation to give. He has sent video messages for the most irrelevant causes (irrelevant at least with respect to the office he claims to hold – the Papacy). He has conducted live chats with children of the educational Scholas Occurrentes Foundation and with astronauts aboard the International Space Station; he has made a long video for the secular TED conference; he has spoken up in defense of persecuted and mistreated albinos in Africa; he has given countless interviews (probably around 50 by now), even to anti-Catholic reporters. In 2017, the secular G20 summit got its share of wisdom from the pretend-pontiff; the same Francis had plenty to say to swimmers about their “solid” sport in “liquid” water; and when a psychotherapist needed a foreword for his book about moaning, Francis was happy to oblige. The Jesuit Antipope has condemned deforestation in the Amazon region; he inserted himself into the U.S. presidential election in 2016; and there is not a single migrant crossing some border illegally without Francis’ outspoken support. For heaven’s sake, the “Pope” even sent a video greeting to the American Football Super Bowl competition.

Let’s not kid ourselves: Had Ireland voted in a referendum on migrant quotas, the quality of tap water, or equal access to public housing, Francis would have been all over it. For the past few months he would have given it his all, making mention of it in countless homilies, speeches, interviews, audiences, off-the-cuff comments to reporters, and a dedicated video message to the people of Ireland.

Yet when it comes to a very significant referendum that directly impacts the most vulnerable of the members of a nation that once prided itself on being Catholic, Francis is curiously unavailable for comment.

The objection is sometimes made that Francis is already on record as condemning abortion, calling it cruel, inhumane, a terrible crime, etc., and therefore there was no need for him to address the people of Ireland to exhort them to vote against the “legalization” of abortion because his — and the church’s — position on abortion is known.

But this argument does not hold water. Yes, of course Francis has condemned abortion in the past, albeit very infrequently when compared to the number of words that flow from his Modernist mouth. Yes, his position is known. But so what? Francis’ position on the homeless, the poor, migrants, forests and rivers, education, ecumenism, soup kitchens, and the Mafia is also well known, yet he never ceases to inform us of it.

The question isn’t whether Francis opposes abortion or not. Of course he does — at least officially. The point is that he is doing everything in his power to de-emphasize the importance of abortion. He is not doing what he could and ought to be doing, all the while he speaks up about so many other issues whose importance pales in comparison to abortion. What father or mother would refuse to remind their child of some essentials before making an important decision — on the grounds that “he already knows this because we’ve mentioned it before”?

Consider what Francis could have done: He could have issued a stern warning against anyone who professes to be a Catholic and votes in favor of abortion in the referendum. He could have threatened severe ecclesiastical punishments, including excommunication and interdict, and enacted the necessary legislation in case it isn’t already in place. He could have encouraged people to go to the polls lest a great evil — and with it, God’s punishment — should befall the nation. Etc. There is so much he could have done that he didn’t do. Francis’ silence and inaction here are deafening, and it is clear that they are deliberate and calculated, revealing that the man really does not care about abortion in the least, despite his occasional protestations — and even phone calls — to the contrary. It does not suffice to look at what a man says; we must also look at what he does, especially at what he does habitually and compared to what else he does and doesn’t do in order to get a true picture of what the man believes and stands for.

With all his incessant blather, Francis’ occasional words against abortion are drowned out by everything else he is saying, and this is entirely intentional. The long-term goal is to make the Pope — for that is what he is perceived to be by the world — an irrelevant figure in matters of Faith or morals in the minds of men. After 5+ years of Francis, who does not think that the “Pope” is a contemptible buffoon who never shuts up? Agree with him when he says something good; ignore him when he says something bad — that is the principle that Modernists and “Traditionalists” in the Vatican II Church agree on.

Francis’ refusal to address the Irish abortion referendum is not out of character for him in the least. We recall his deafening silence with regard to the “gay marriage” referendum in the same country three years ago; we remember his shameful silence with regard to abortion when meeting with President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil during his World Youth Day tour in Rio de Janeiro in 2013. And just the other day, Francis totally ignored, once again, the March for Life that took place under his nose in Rome. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.

However, we are willing to make one prediction: Tomorrow, May 27, Francis will “lament” the results of the abortion referendum as part of his Angelus address. Because at that point, his words cannot make a difference anymore, and people will be able to point to his words and say, “See, he does care.”

That’s how the game works.

Image source: Wikimedia Commons
License: Public domain