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The show must go on!

Gigantic Statue of “Pope” Francis comes to Ciudad Juarez, Mexico

One year ago today, “Pope” Francis visited the city of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, which is situated directly at the border with the United States, right across from the American city of El Paso, Texas. Ciudad Juarez is an embattled city and plays a central role in the ongoing Mexican drug war. In 2010, the Juarez murder rate exceeded 3,500 people.

As part of his trip to Mexico in February 2016, the “Pope” visited Juarez, meeting there with prisoners, performing a Novus Ordo worship service, and holding a farewell ceremony at the international airport. Details with links to videos and transcripts of speeches can be found on our page covering Francis’ entire Mexico trip in 2016:

Today, the city of Juarez is unveiling a big statue of Francis to commermorate the historic occasion of his visit a year ago. The sculptor is Pedro Francisco Rodriguez. The base of the statue was built by Perches Funeral Home and is a cube that curiously measures 6″ x 6″ x 6″, according to owner Salvador Perches. The statue will be solemnly unveiled tonight at 6:30 pm MT after a Novus Ordo “Mass” celebrated by Mr. Jose Torres Campos, the Novus Ordo bishop of the diocese of Juarez.

The following brief video clip shows the statue being moved to its destination for the official unveiling today:

Here are some links to videos, photos, and more information on this Mexican tribute to the world’s most infamous apostate:

The setting up of this statue in Juarez is simply the latest installment in the insufferable “Francis Show” we have been witnessing since March 13, 2013. Unfortunately, we can expect that, like all other shows, this one too must go on.

22 Responses to “Gigantic Francis Statue comes to Juarez, Mexico”

  1. ClareB

    What the heck? a coincidence? …Jorge’s giant statue erected in a Mexican town… near the US border… in a city of bridges… The location of this eyesore rather highlights political Jorge’s globalist agenda, does it not?… really should have been sculpted with a boat in his hand rather than a dove.
    From Wilipedia:
    There are four international ports of entry connecting Ciudad Juárez and El Paso, including the Bridge of the Americas, Ysleta International Bridge, Paso del Norte Bridge and Stanton Street Bridge. These combined allowed 22,958,472 crossings in 2008,[7] making Ciudad Juárez a major point of entry and transportation into the U.S. for all of central northern Mexico.

  2. Junior Ribeiro

    I am rather skeptical of skepticism about the signs that God gives us that he does not like something. And the apostate and blasphemous Bergoglio could not escape these signs. 666: number of the beast and number of its prophet.

  3. Geremia16

    Juarez has a serious drug and prostitution problem (which are signs of a serious spiritual sickness), yet Francis brought his cult of man there in 2016, even referencing Laudato Sì in his speeches!

  4. CT

    This has bad mojo written all over it. I am wondering if this will end like the massive JPII crucifix that crushed a handicapped person on the street named after Roncalli… Stay tuned, I’m sure…

  5. juan323

    You know what I thought was really sad to hear was that Chaos Frank’s vestments he wore to Philippines are in a Filipino church so people can pray over them. It felt a wave of dread when a family surfaced claiming a healing by touching Frank. Where is this all going to end up?

    • ClareB

      Good point. While not altogether unknown, it’s rarely done (except usually by people with a big ego problem, otherwise the person would refuse permission to erect it. Maybe in the Vatican at this time, no one can do anything without Begoglio’s approval?). Most political/secular statues that have to do with communist leaders are accompanied by a big fanfare when the people destroy the statues after their rule is toppled.
      P.S. Over at ‘Call Me Jorge’ website today there is a report posted covering another image of Jorge that was approved.

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