June 3, 1963 – June 3, 2013

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On the 50th Anniversary of the Death of Antipope John XXIII

It’s hard to believe, but the Novus Ordo religion has only existed for some 50+ years. It officially began after the death of Pope Pius XII with the usurpation of the papal throne by Cardinal Angelo Roncalli (1881-1963) on October 28, 1958. Roncalli’s false pontificate was relatively short but long enough for him to prepare the way for the systematic destruction of Catholicism: the appointment of Giovanni Battista Montini (“Paul VI”) as a “cardinal” in 1958 (thus realistically enabling him to become his successor, which is exactly what happened), the establishment of the “Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity”, the Vatican body dealing with ecumenical affairs and relations with Jews (1960), the introduction of the name of St. Joseph into the Canon of the Mass as well as other significant changes to the Roman Missal in 1962 (this became known as the ’62 Missal, which the SSPX and most other non-sedevacantist ‘traditionalists’ call the “Traditional Mass”), the deal with the Russian Schismatics in favor of Communism at the Pact of Metz (1962), the calling of the modernist Second Vatican Council (formally convoked in 1961; met from 1962-65), and the promulgation of the Masonic encyclical Pacem in Terris (1963).

Roncalli was not the first antipope in the history of the Church to choose the name John XXIII. The first one was Baldassare Cossa (d. 1419), a false claimant to the papacy at the time of the Western Schism. In the Novus Ordo Church, Roncalli is a “Blessed”, having been “beatified” by Antipope John Paul II on September 3, 2000 (a real slap in the face of Traditionalists also because September 3 is the Feast of Pope St. Pius X). We provide the links below to shed a bit more light on this important historical figure, whose bogus ‘pontificate’ marks the beginning of the apostate Vatican II Sect that calls itself the Catholic Church, and ushered in the eclipse of the true Catholic Church prophesied in the 19th century by Our Lady of LaSalette.

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